Getting Settled

Nestled against the Canadian border, at the tippy top of the U.S. East Coast, lies the tiny town of Lubec.  This town effectively marks the beginning of the Bay of Fundy, a region known for having the largest tidal range in the world (up to 50 feet in some places!).  Lubec’s tides range about 18-22 feet, which is still enough to make a dramatic difference in the landscape every 6 hours or so.

Welcome to Lubec

Welcome to Lubec

As of this past Monday, Lubec gained three new temporary residents—myself, Dana, and Tricia. This is the farthest north Tricia has ever been, and it’s the first time I’ve been to this area of coastal Maine.  As a bit of a Mainer at heart, I was excited to get back to the Atlantic after being landlocked for months in Syracuse.  We were greeted with a warm welcome by the New England Aquarium team and by the best of Maine’s warm, sunny summer weather.  The weather held out just long enough for us to launch the R/V Selkie before, in typical Maine fashion, turning to rain the next day.

I suppose the rain is good for being productive inside, and it did manage to stop long enough for a light-hearted game of soccer.  Today’s weather features pea soup fog along with the rain, so we’re still waiting to go find some moms and calves for our project.  Given the bumper crop of calves and our luck in Cape Cod and the Southeast this year, we’re hopeful for some good data from the Fundy feeding grounds!

As a parting note, I’ll leave you with a couple of neat comparisons:

 

Looking across to Campobello Island (High tide)

Looking across to Campobello Island
(High tide)

Looking across to Campobello Island (Low tide)

Looking across to Campobello Island
(Low tide)

 

AND…

 

View from my window without fog

View from my window without fog

The view from my window with fog

The view from my window with fog

 

 

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